Retirement insights from a Colorado PERA perspective

News You Should Know

News You Should Know: Does retirement stack up to expectations?

Retirement
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Most retirees find retirement doesn’t live up to their expectations | Yahoo Finance

According to a September 2020 study, about three-quarters of retirees say their retirement lifestyle doesn’t match their pre-retirement expectations. What’s the reason? There are multiple. Plans of seeing the world, for example, might actually become a lower priority: Staying healthy is the number-one priority for retirees, followed by “quality time spent with family and friends.” Traveling is a “distant third.” Another reason? Fear of outliving assets.

Has COVID-19 really affected life expectancy? | Marketwatch

PERA members know that life expectancy is a statistic that PERA’s Board and staff follow. Understanding how long people will likely live is an essential component to understanding lifetime income. A question that’s often asked is: “how will COVID-19 affect life expectancy?” The loss of life has been staggering over the past year. This analysis shows that while life expectancy is unlikely to be affected much in the long run, it also not the best measure to use when trying to capture the magnitude of COVID-19’s impact.

Some Coloradans Are Paying Tens Of Thousands For Health Insurance. A Proposed Fix Is Stirring More Controversy At The Capitol | KUNC

For the third time in three years, Rep. Dylan Roberts (D-Avon) is running a bill in the Colorado legislature that would create a public health care option and be available to all Coloradans. Despite the bill failing in previous years, Roberts said such a plan would provide lower-cost health care, particularly in areas without many other options. A new feature in this year’s version: insurers, care providers, and others would be given certain goals to reduce patient costs. A state option would be offered to Coloradans in 2025 only if those goals are not met.

Help! I’m Afraid to Retire, Even Though I Can Afford to | Kiplinger

A financial planner shares her observations of a trend she sees in clients: After years preparing for retirement, the date gets closer and the client gets cold feet. One client captured the sentiment, saying: “I don’t know if I can actually start to withdraw the money and feel good about it. I have been so focused on saving, investing and planning for years that I don’t know how I will feel about starting to take money out, even if it’s for things I think I want.” This is a common feeling, especially for those without access to the reliable stream of lifetime income found in a defined benefit plan.


News You Should Know is a digest of news from publications around the nation about finance, investing, and retirement.

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